The Station Camp by H. David Wright - David Wright Art – Gallatin, Tennessee; www.davidwrightart.com Used with the permission of the artist

Frontiersman with Pipe by H. David Wright - David Wright Art – Gallatin, Tennessee; www.davidwrightart.com Used with the permission of the artist

The pioneering families coming into the Eleven Point River Valley in the early years of the 19th century were following typical migration practices used by their ancestors for generations past. Their earliest kinsmen, primarily Scots-Irish and English, arrived on the American continent with the intent to find land of their own.

At the beginning of the 18th century these hardy ancestors had not been intimidated by the rugged mountainous lands to the west of the settled Atlantic coastal regions. For their labors they could claim and improve lands – and eventually gain ownership in their Far West. They built homesteads and roads and governments.

In the late 18th century it was time for the third and fourth generations descended from these early ancestors that opened the first frontiers of America to continue on the trek west. The land west of the Mississippi had now become their Far West.

Local histories relate that the first men coming into the Ozarks frontier between the 1790s and 1815 came in as market hunters. Some superseded United States governance of the region. Charles Hatcher, James Hatcher, and Jacob Waggoner, all future residents of the area that became Davidson Township, were known to be among the early hunters in the upper Eleven Point River Valley.

 

Further Reading:


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Black River Technical College
Pocahontas & Paragould, Arkansas

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